New prints by Ana Maria Hernando

“I have been painting enormous flowers, flowers that cannot be contained by the paper. “Somos Nube” (We are Cloud) and “Somos Aire” (We are Air), my newest prints, profess a grand beauty I am seeing everywhere.

The persistent feminine force cannot be denied any longer. Why are we so afraid of the presence of the feminine? It is unstoppable. Flowers, in their quiet but urgent power, are our most trustworthy prophets”.

Ana Maria Hernando

Somos Nube

Evan Colbert: New Lithographs

We are very pleased to announce the publication of two new Evan Colbert lithographs, “Astronomy Dominé” and “Obscured by Clouds”.

"Astronomy Dominé"
Colbert talks about his recent work:
In late 2017 I began a series of paintings based on the concept of Imaginary Maps. Using found stencils, spray paint, and other materials, I began to build compositions out of layers of dots, shapes, lines, and grids in a process much like sketching. This work was inspired by the puzzle-like arrays that occur at the intersections of town and country where the imperfect grids and structures of civilization give way to the abstract geometric patterns as viewed from above.
"Obscured by Clouds"
The “Astronomy Dominé” and “Obscured by Clouds” prints are a distillation of some of the earlier paintings and prints, cropped, enlarged in scale, and assembled from the same collection of stencils, objects, and patterns. The interplay of shapes, textures and colors lead the eye around the prints providing abundant opportunity for visual discovery.

Astronomy Dominé is an eight color lithograph printed from six plates on white Rives BFK paper 22¼ x 30″. Obscured by Clouds is a nine color lithograph from five plates on white Rives BFK paper 22¼ x 30″. Both prints have been printed in editions of 20, plus proofs and are each $1,200 plus packing and shipping.

Deluvium

We are pleased to announce a new lithograph by Miho Morinoue.

Deluvium or deluge is a large-scale lithograph depicting a scene where myth and reality co-exist and co-mingle in the moments preceding a great cleanse. Both dark and whimsical, the narrative explores the relationship between human beliefs and civilization as they relate to the enveloping force of nature that sustains or destroys them.

See the video.

“Brazilian Rainforest”

We are pleased to announce a new color woodcut by Hiroki Morinoue.

Morinoue first observed the Brazilian rainforest in 1997 when the exhibition he designed, The Kona Coffee Story: Along the Hawai’i Belt Road, was shown in Sâo Paulo.

In this new print, the artist  honors the rainforest in Brazil. The Amazon is home to an estimated 16,000 tree species and is the world’s largest rainforest.  But in the last 40 years at least 20% of it has been destroyed.

“Brazilian Rainforest” is an eleven color woodcut printed from eight woodblocks carved by the artist.

ENRIQUE CHAGOYA: NEW LITHOGRAPH

We are very pleased to announce Enrique Chagoya’s new lithograph “Everyone is an Alienìgeno”.
I am a US citizen and I no longer hold a Legal Alien card, but it is still a reminder of the political and xenophobic borders in many places in the world. Humanity shares the same genome and we are all the same species with great ethnic and cultural diversity. For me such variety enriches our lives in many ways. In this print I am using my sense of humor to eliminate stereotypes and help others to see all human beings with many beautiful differences.

CLAIRE SHERMAN: NEW LITHOGRAPHS

We are very pleased to announce the release of two new Claire Sherman lithographs, “Tree and Water” and “Underbrush”.

Tree and WaterUnderbrushSherman’s paintings and prints propel the viewer into a claustrophobic and unstable world through a perspective that shimmies between representation and abstraction. Her works reference idealistic visions of the sublime, while the medley of imagery presented eliminates the need to identify the actual places – these works do not seek to portray a specific view or experience. They address the ubiquity of imagery we associate with the genre of landscape, nullifying a sense of particularity.

John Newman: New Prints

We are pleased to announce four new John Newman lithographs, “Head First”, “Second Head First”, “A small monument to Heliotropism” and “Looking through to ‘Light and lace-maker”.

A small monument to HeliotropismLooking through to Light and lace-makerThese prints are both specific in formal design and yet elicit a wide spectrum of responses – they ask to be interrogated, mediated upon, and, marveled at.

“The looking through, the rainbow roll, the spatial ambiguity in “A small monument for Heliotropism” and “Looking through to ‘Light and lace-maker” are as much a consequence of lithography as they are of rendering a fictional space where the image of a sculpture appears.”

“A SINGLE JOY OF SONG”

A Single Joy of Song is Betty Woodman’s last print. We began discussing this project with her in 2016. She sent a large three part study that would make a wonderful woodcut. Betty made plans to come to Shark’s Ink. to begin work on the triptych but had to postpone the visit. We picked up the project again in November 2018 while Betty was in Italy. She said we should start cutting woodblocks and proofing colors. We sent her proofs in Italy and had numerous phone calls and emails as the work progressed. She was pleased with the way the print came together.
Betty returned to New York and we were close to finalizing the woodcut when she went into the hospital and died January 2, 2018. We received permission from her son Charlie Woodman and the estate to make the final changes we had discussed with Betty and to complete the edition.

A Single Joy of Song is a twenty-color woodcut/lithograph with chine collé hand printed on white Thai Mulberry and white Rives BFK paper from fourteen woodblocks and three lithographic plates approved by the artist. A Single Joy of Song has been printed in an edition of 30, plus proofs, 27 x 70½ inches and is estate stamped “WOODMAN”.

The Ghosts of Borderlandia

We are very pleased to announce the publication of a new Enrique Chagoya lithographic codex The Ghosts of Borderlandia.

“The imagery in this codex refers to the borders that people build between themselves. In The Ghosts of Borderlandia, people’s eyes are hidden behind a wall or underground to symbolize the lack of sight that borders create. The invisible borders create stereotypes that dehumanize the “other” and creates an “us vs. them” context. There are physical and invisible borders. They may be between social classes, genders, religions, ethnicities and cultures. Viewers may discover some recognizable artists and stereotypical characters in front and behind the wall.” Enrique Chagoya

The Ghosts of Borderlandia is an eleven color lithograph with chine collé, printed from nine plates. The plates were made from mylars hand drawn and painted by the artist and xerox copies of found material. The codex has been printed on handmade Amate paper with white Thai Mulberry chine collé, 15 x 80″ in an edition of 30, plus proofs.

New John Buck woodcuts

We are very pleased to announce the publication of two new John Buck woodcuts, “Moscow on the Seine” and “Cannonball Creek”.

"Moscow on the Seine"
“In “Moscow on the Seine” an unknown person in a bear skin strolls across a background of Russian political and historic figures and architectural sites. Among the images, a bare-chested Putin rides a horse that tramples a man while a woman offers Putin a crown. Buck was inspired by an illustration of the Russian holiday, Maslenitsa, a celebration that dates to the 18th century.
“Moscow on the Seine” is a fourteen color woodcut printed from four woodblocks and one pochoir stencil on white Thai Mulberry paper in an edition of 15, plus proofs. The print measures to 28¾ x 46 inches.
"Cannonball Creek"
The American Bison, or buffalo as it is commonly known, symbolizes wild nature and western culture. Buck’s “Cannonball Creek” depicts the toll taken on native peoples, the land and wildlife they depended upon. From railroads to pipelines, we see in this print a tragedy on a staggering scale motivated by unrestrained resource exploitation for commercial purposes and misguided U.S. Indian policy.
“Cannonball Creek” is a six color woodcut printed from three woodblocks on white Thai Mulberry paper in an edition of 15, plus proofs. The print measures to 25½ x 40¼ inches.